Penllergare Valley Woods

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Going Wild for Wildflowers

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Edward Tucker, Woodland Warden, and Keith Clements, volunteer ranger, organised a wildflower walk on Saturday 15th June to mark Wales Biodiversity Week. Nearly one hundred species were seen and named – these were just a few of them.

Southern Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza praetermissa) – One of several Dactylorhiza orchids, known as the ‘spotted orchids’. They bear this name because most have dark purple blotches on their leaves. Did you know? All orchids are protected by UK law but D praetermissa is threatened by loss of habitat. Reference: http://www.devonwildlifetrust.org/species/Southern+marsh+orchid/

Southern Marsh Orchid by Ian Morris

Southern Marsh Orchid by Ian Morris

Pignut (Conopodium majus). Common in open woodland, hedgerows and dry grassland, Pignut is a small umbellifer (member of the carrot family) with fine leaves and delicate stems. Small umbels (umbrella-like clusters) of white flowers appear between April and June and are attractive to a range of insects such as soldier beetles and hoverflies. Reference: http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/species/pignut

Pignut by Ian Morris

Pignut by Ian Morris

Yellow Archangel (Lamiastrum galeobdolon). The flowers of Yellow Archangel come into bloom just as the Bluebells are fading, replacing the blue carpet of a spring woodland with a golden-yellow one. A plant of ancient woodlands and hedgerows, Yellow Archangel may well have got its common name from its virtue of not stinging, despite being part of the ‘dead’-nettle family. Reference: http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/species/yellow-archangel

Yellow Archangel by Ian Morris

Yellow Archangel by Ian Morris

Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris). Columbine is a tall plant of woodland rides, fens and damp places, and is also a favourite cottage-garden plant, various forms often escaping into the countryside. Its nodding, bonnet-shaped, purple flowers appear in May and June and will self-seed in a garden to provide a colourful and wild border, great for nectar-loving bees. Reference: http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/species/columbine

Aqualegia Vulgaris by Ian Morris

Columbine by Ian Morris

A big thank you to everyone for coming! Thankyou to Edward and Keith for organising it. And thanks to Ian Morris and Peter Thomas for taking photographs. 🙂

Wildflower Walk by Peter Thomas 15/06/13

Wildflower Walk by Peter Thomas 15/06/13

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